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Churches (235)

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Reykjavik in Winter
Reykjavik in Winter Reykjavík is the capital and largest city of Iceland. It has a latitude of 64°08' N, making it the world's northernmost capital of a sovereign state, and is a popular tourist destination.[6] It is located in southwestern Iceland, on the southern shore of Faxa Bay. With a population of around 130,000 (and over 200,000 in the Capital Region), it is the heart of Iceland's cultural, economic and governmental activity.
Hallgrímskirkja in Reykjavík
Hallgrímskirkja in Reykjavík Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 73 metres (244 ft), it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in Iceland. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614 to 1674), author of the Passion Hymns
Þingvallakirkja
Þingvallakirkja Þingvallavatn is a lake in south-western Iceland. With a surface of 84 km² it is the largest natural lake in Iceland. Its greatest depth is at 114 m. At the northern shore of the lake, at Þingvellir (after which the lake is named), the Alþingi, the national parliament, was founded in the year 930. The lake is part of the Þingvellir National Park. The volcanic origin of the islands in the lake is clearly visible. The cracks and faults around it, of which the famous Almannagjá canyon is the largest, is where the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates meet
Hrafnseyri on the northern shores of the Arnarfiord Bay.
Hrafnseyri on the northern shores of the Arnarfiord Bay. Hrafnseyri is a farm and a former parsonage on the northern shores of the Arnarfiord Bay. On the 17th of June 1811, Jon Sigurdsson (†1879) was born there. His birthday, June 17th, is Iceland's National Day. He played a unique role in the country's fight for independence, was a member of parliament until the end of his years after it resumed its role in 1845 after an intermission of 47 years and its president as well from 1849.
Saurbæjarkirkja at Rauðisandur
Saurbæjarkirkja at Rauðisandur Saurbæjarkirkja in Rauðisandur Church (Saurbaearkirkja in Raudisandur) is located in the southwest part of the Westfjords, not far from Látrabjarg Cliff, Europe’s westernmost point. This small wooden church measures 11 metres in length and is 5.5 metres wide. It stands just above Rauðisandur Beach (Red Sand beach), where the sand is white, orange and red in colour. Rauðisandur Beach is among the longest beaches in Iceland
Úlfljótsvatnskirkja church
Úlfljótsvatnskirkja church The church is situated by Lake Úlfljótsvatn, which lies just south of Lake Þingvallavatn. It is located approximately 70 km east of Reykjavík
Úlfljótsvatnskirkja church
Úlfljótsvatnskirkja church The church is situated by Lake Úlfljótsvatn, which lies just south of Lake Þingvallavatn. It is located approximately 70 km east of Reykjavík
Church in Vík village
Church in Vík village Víkurkirkja (Vikurkirkja) is the name of the town's church, located high on a hill. An eruption of Katla Volcano could melt enough ice to trigger an enormous flash flood, potentially large enough to obliterate the entire town. The church is believed to be the only building that would survive such a flood. Thus, the people of Vík practice periodic drills and are trained to rush to the church at the first sign of an eruption.
Stone Church
Stone Church Hvalsneskirkja Stone Church at Reykjanes - Iceland
Stone Church
Stone Church Hvalsneskirkja Stone Church at Reykjanes - Iceland