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Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Álftir ( Whooper swans ) Taking off
Álftir ( Whooper swans ) Taking off The Whooper Swan (Cygnus), pronounced hooper swan, is a large Northern Hemisphere swan. It is the Eurasian counterpart of the North American trumpeter swan, and the type species for the Cygnus genus. Francis Willughby and John Ray’s Ornithology of 1676 referred to this swan as “the Elk, Hooper, or wild Swan”. The scientific name is from cygnus, the Latin for “swan”. #Travel in #Iceland with: www.discoverwildiceland.com © 2017 Photos available at http://www.IceStockPhotos.com
Stokkönd (Mallard) making new Mallards
Stokkönd (Mallard) making new Mallards The mallard or wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and subtropical Americas, Eurasia, and North Africa, and has been introduced to New Zealand, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, the Falkland Islands and South Africa. This duck belongs to the subfamily Anatinae of the waterfowl family Anatidae. Male mallard, Sweden 2016 The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head and are grey on wings and belly, while the females (hens or ducks) have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Both sexes have an area of white-bordered black speculum feathers which commonly also include iridescent blue feathers especially among males. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are social animals preferring to congregate in groups or flocks of varying sizes. This species is the main ancestor of most breeds of domesticated ducks. #Travel in #Iceland with: www.discoverwildiceland.com © 2017 Photos available at http://www.IceStockPhotos.com
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas Eldvorp is a 10 km long crater row to the northwest of Grindavik. It has several big craters with extensive thermal activity within and outside one of them, where a great deal of steam of about 280°C escapes. In older days, women from Grindavík baked bread in the warm steam and took the trail called "Brauðstígur" or Breadtrail up there from Grindavík.