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Volcanos (268)

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Nyrðri-Eldborg with mountains Bláfjöll in the background
Nyrðri-Eldborg with mountains Bláfjöll in the background Nyrðri Eldborg from air all covered with snow. The view is to Vífilsfell, Blákollur, Esja and Reykjavík city
Volcano from air in wintertime
Volcano from air in wintertime Volcano Stóra-Eldborg at Reykjanes from air in wintertime. -The lava of Eldborg is an olivine-rich pahoehoe. The age is not well known, but judging from the soil cover, gravel deposits covering it and the effects of weathering on its surface, it might be 7000-8000 years old.
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas Eldvorp is a 10 km long crater row to the northwest of Grindavik. It has several big craters with extensive thermal activity within and outside one of them, where a great deal of steam of about 280°C escapes. In older days, women from Grindavík baked bread in the warm steam and took the trail called "Brauðstígur" or Breadtrail up there from Grindavík.
Tjarnarhnúkur crader
Tjarnarhnúkur crader Tjarnarhnúkur in the highlands of Hellisheiði
Lakagígar Craters from air
Lakagígar Craters from air Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Þórðarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction
Lakagígar Craters from air
Lakagígar Craters from air Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Þórðarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction
Lakagígar Craters from air
Lakagígar Craters from air Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Þórðarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction
Where the Lava ends
Where the Lava ends Lava near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano Hekla is a stratovolcano in the south of Iceland with a height of 1,491 m (4,892 ft). Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes; over 20 eruptions have occurred in and around the volcano since 874. During the Middle Ages, Europeans called the volcano the "Gateway to Hell". The volcano's frequent large eruptions have covered much of Iceland with tephra and these layers can be used to date eruptions of Iceland's other volcanos. 10% of the tephra created in Iceland in the last thousand years has come from Hekla, amounting to 5 km3. The volcano has produced one of the largest volumes of lava of any in the world in the last millennium, around 8 km3
Volcanic Eruption South of Iceland in glacier Eyjafjallajokull a
Volcanic Eruption South of Iceland in glacier Eyjafjallajokull a On 20 March 2010, an eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano began in Fimmvörðuháls following months of small earthquakes under the Eyjafjallajökull glacier. The eruption began around 23:00 and opened a 0.5 km (0.31 mi) long fissure vent on the northern part of the pass.The new lava field was named Goðahraun, because the lava streamed in the area Goðaland. These official names were accepted by the Minister of Education and Culture 15 June 2010.