Your Shopping Cart is empty.
Search
All files
Keywords
Photo
Advanced search
Photo Filters
Categories

Results (8310)

 Flow
 Auto paging
Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse
Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse. Reykjanes. Iceland
Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse
Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse Northern lights over Gerðistangaviti lighthouse. Reykjanes. Iceland
Álftir ( Whooper swans ) Taking off
Álftir ( Whooper swans ) Taking off The Whooper Swan (Cygnus), pronounced hooper swan, is a large Northern Hemisphere swan. It is the Eurasian counterpart of the North American trumpeter swan, and the type species for the Cygnus genus. Francis Willughby and John Ray’s Ornithology of 1676 referred to this swan as “the Elk, Hooper, or wild Swan”. The scientific name is from cygnus, the Latin for “swan”. #Travel in #Iceland with: www.discoverwildiceland.com © 2017 Photos available at http://www.IceStockPhotos.com
Stokkönd (Mallard) making new Mallards
Stokkönd (Mallard) making new Mallards The mallard or wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and subtropical Americas, Eurasia, and North Africa, and has been introduced to New Zealand, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, the Falkland Islands and South Africa. This duck belongs to the subfamily Anatinae of the waterfowl family Anatidae. Male mallard, Sweden 2016 The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head and are grey on wings and belly, while the females (hens or ducks) have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Both sexes have an area of white-bordered black speculum feathers which commonly also include iridescent blue feathers especially among males. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are social animals preferring to congregate in groups or flocks of varying sizes. This species is the main ancestor of most breeds of domesticated ducks. #Travel in #Iceland with: www.discoverwildiceland.com © 2017 Photos available at http://www.IceStockPhotos.com
Mountain Lómagnúpur with reflection in a small lake in front
Mountain Lómagnúpur with reflection in a small lake in front Mountain Lómagnúpur (767 m) on Skeiðarársandur, south coast Iceland. Lómagnúpur is one of the most instantly recognisable of all Icelandic mountains, was once thought to be the home of a giant named Járngrímur. The giant of Lómagnúpur has earned himself a place on Iceland’s coat of arms, where he stands with the guardian spirits of the other three quarters of the country, holding his iron staff in his hand. The farm at the foot of Mt. Lómagnúpur is called Núpsstaður.
Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Northern lights, Aurora borealis Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Reykjavík City Center with Harpa in the foreground
Reykjavík City Center with Harpa in the foreground Reykjavík is believed to be the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland, which, according to Ingólfur Arnarson, was established in AD 874. Until the 19th century, there was no urban development in the city location. The city was founded in 1786 as an official trading town and grew steadily over the next decades, as it transformed into a regional and later national centre of commerce, population, and governmental activities. It is among the cleanest, greenest, and safest cities in the world
Sundahöfn Harbour in Reykjavík
Sundahöfn Harbour in Reykjavík Sundahöfn is a harbour in Reykjavik and extends from Laugarnes at Vatnagarður to the bottom of Ellidavogur. The harbour is divided into several quays, were the premises for the shipping companies Eimskip and Samskip are located, along with a quay for the cruise ships that are too large for the harbour in downtown Reykjavík.
Reykjavík Seen from above
Reykjavík Seen from above Reykjavík is believed to be the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland, which, according to Ingólfur Arnarson, was established in AD 874. Until the 19th century, there was no urban development in the city location. The city was founded in 1786 as an official trading town and grew steadily over the next decades, as it transformed into a regional and later national centre of commerce, population, and governmental activities. It is among the cleanest, greenest, and safest cities in the world
Reykjavík Seen from above
Reykjavík Seen from above Reykjavík is believed to be the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland, which, according to Ingólfur Arnarson, was established in AD 874. Until the 19th century, there was no urban development in the city location. The city was founded in 1786 as an official trading town and grew steadily over the next decades, as it transformed into a regional and later national centre of commerce, population, and governmental activities. It is among the cleanest, greenest, and safest cities in the world