Loading...
  • The Icelandic Photo Stock Store
    IceStockPhotos.com
    The best way to buy your Professional Photos
    Browse catalog
  • One web
    For all the Icelandic Photos you need
    View Photos
  • Signup now
    Find your right shot - Simple and Fast
    signup

Latest images

  • At the edge of Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers  - #Icelan

    At the edge of Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers - #Icelan

    There's a reason Falljökull means the "Falling Glacier." Crashing down over hundreds of years on its way from Vatnajökull National Park to the Atlantic Ocean, it is literally a giant frozen waterfall cascading decade by decade, millimeter by millimeter in front of your eyes. It also happens to be an incredibly accessible outlet glacier. A small brook, Fallsjokulskvisl falls from the glacier and close to it are two canyons, Graenafjallsgljufur and Storalekjargljufur, also well worth checking out. Virkisjokull is an outlet of Vatnajokull glacier and thus a part of Vatnajokull National Park. At Virkisjokull glacier you can explore impressive ice formations and crevasses, take in the scenic view of the surrounding mountains and the impressive icefall, crashing down hundreds of meters. The tremendous power of glaciers as agents of landscape change can be understood when one sees the speed at which ice is able to flow. Their ability to shape and carve modern mountain chains can be seen all over the world, and their legacy spreads far wider, into landscapes now totally devoid of permanent ice, both upland and lowland. The BGS Virkisjökull Glacier Observatory was established in 2009, and new equipment has been installed each year to monitor the key components of this glaciated catchment, namely climate, ice dynamics, landscape change, hydrology and groundwater. The Icelandic stock Photo Store – IceStockPhotos.com is an attractive and economical way to satisfy your creative requirements. At http://www.icestockphotos.com you can find thousands of #Professional high resolution photos from #Iceland to suit your design requirements. One web for all the #PHOTOS you need from #Iceland.
  • Looking at Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers with Rauðikam

    Looking at Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers with Rauðikam

    There's a reason Falljökull means the "Falling Glacier." Crashing down over hundreds of years on its way from Vatnajökull National Park to the Atlantic Ocean, it is literally a giant frozen waterfall cascading decade by decade, millimeter by millimeter in front of your eyes. It also happens to be an incredibly accessible outlet glacier. A small brook, Fallsjokulskvisl falls from the glacier and close to it are two canyons, Graenafjallsgljufur and Storalekjargljufur, also well worth checking out. Virkisjokull is an outlet of Vatnajokull glacier and thus a part of Vatnajokull National Park. At Virkisjokull glacier you can explore impressive ice formations and crevasses, take in the scenic view of the surrounding mountains and the impressive icefall, crashing down hundreds of meters. The tremendous power of glaciers as agents of landscape change can be understood when one sees the speed at which ice is able to flow. Their ability to shape and carve modern mountain chains can be seen all over the world, and their legacy spreads far wider, into landscapes now totally devoid of permanent ice, both upland and lowland. The BGS Virkisjökull Glacier Observatory was established in 2009, and new equipment has been installed each year to monitor the key components of this glaciated catchment, namely climate, ice dynamics, landscape change, hydrology and groundwater.
  • Looking at Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers with Rauðikam

    Looking at Falljökull and Virkisjökull Glaciers with Rauðikam

    There's a reason Falljökull means the "Falling Glacier." Crashing down over hundreds of years on its way from Vatnajökull National Park to the Atlantic Ocean, it is literally a giant frozen waterfall cascading decade by decade, millimeter by millimeter in front of your eyes. It also happens to be an incredibly accessible outlet glacier. A small brook, Fallsjokulskvisl falls from the glacier and close to it are two canyons, Graenafjallsgljufur and Storalekjargljufur, also well worth checking out. Virkisjokull is an outlet of Vatnajokull glacier and thus a part of Vatnajokull National Park. At Virkisjokull glacier you can explore impressive ice formations and crevasses, take in the scenic view of the surrounding mountains and the impressive icefall, crashing down hundreds of meters. The tremendous power of glaciers as agents of landscape change can be understood when one sees the speed at which ice is able to flow. Their ability to shape and carve modern mountain chains can be seen all over the world, and their legacy spreads far wider, into landscapes now totally devoid of permanent ice, both upland and lowland. The BGS Virkisjökull Glacier Observatory was established in 2009, and new equipment has been installed each year to monitor the key components of this glaciated catchment, namely climate, ice dynamics, landscape change, hydrology and groundwater.
  • Opening of LacaCave Leiðarendi - #Iceland

    Opening of LacaCave Leiðarendi - #Iceland

    Leiðarendi is a lava tube located in a lava field close to Bláfjöll, the Blue Mountains, in southwest Iceland. Leiðarendi is in fact two caves, formed by two seperate eruptions on the explosive Reykjanes Peninsula, one two thousand years ago, the other one thousand years ago. During each, rivers of lava slowly cooled from the outside as they travelled from their erupting craters. A hard rock shell formed over the molten liquid, and as this flushed out, a hollow tube was left. In this case, the two caves collapsed into each other, and leaving a circular path with a few hidden chambers. After another collapse from above, Leiðarendi became accessible. Leiðarendi is notable for its incredibly diverse and colourful scenery, and is considered a prime example of an Icelandic lava tube. The kaleidoscope of colour comes from the minerals brought up in an eruption, with the red from iron, the yellow from sulfur, and the green from copper. A distinctive feature of Leidarendi is various lava flakes that have fallen from its walls and roof, due to frost and erosion. These flakes indicate the many different lava streams that have flowed there subsequently throughout the ages. In the cave you will further see cave walls polished by lava streams along with stalagmites, stalactites and other fascinating formations. It is essential you do not take these, as unlike in limestone caves, they never grow back. In winter you are likely to see glistening natural ice sculptures in the cave, adding further beauty to the already otherworldly scene. n the depths of one of its longest corridors, now protected by a chain, Leiðarendi has an eroding skeleton. It takes a few minutes of observation to realise what it is: a collapsed ram. When first discovered, it caused quite a stir, with the initial belief being that it was brought down by a bandit; after all, punishment for stealing a sheep at different times in Iceland was death, so it would make sense to use this as a hiding place. The she
  • Háabjarg cliffs at Rauðanes in Þistilsfjörður - #Iceland

    Háabjarg cliffs at Rauðanes in Þistilsfjörður - #Iceland

    Rauðanes peninsula is an example of exceptional natural beauty. It is a series of unusual rock formations on the tip of a beautiful inlet, west of Þistilfjörður. A special slice of coastline, featuring collapsed caves, volcanic arches and varied birdlife. A marked trail, 7 km long, circles Rauðanes. The trail leads you to bizarre rock formations, natural arches, caves and secluded beaches. This small and scenic headland is edged by steep cliffs, full of nesting birds, caves and offshore sea stacks.. Heather moorland is the predominant type of vegetation, although there is also a fair amount of grassland. At the start of the walk, you will pass Háabjarg, a rocky outcrop 60 metres in height, whose layers of rock, built up over the centuries, are easily apparent. Amongst the cliffs fortifying Rauðanes point, you can see Lundastapar which are made of very beautiful basalt. Until a few years ago, Lundastapar had quite a big puffin colony but the mink has almost uprooted it. Gluggur is a stone bridge which was formed when part of the roof of a cave, hollowed out by the surf and collapsed leaving only the bridge of stone standing. Not far away is a small beach called Flæðifjara, from where you have a great view over Gatastakkur. Centuries ago, volcanic eruption pressed a small flow of lava into a crack in the existing soil. With time, the forces of nature have eroded the surrounding soil, leaving only the lava sculpture behind. On the next beach, Stakkabásar, there is a small cave called Hannesarhellir. The name Hannes is carved on the wall inside the cave. Word has it, that in the last years of the nineteenth century, two sailors found shelter there in a violent storm. One of them carved his name and his partner’s initials on the wall, with his pocket knife. Off the north shore of Rauðanes are Stakkar, two big pillars of rock rising out of the sea. A puffin bode can be found in Stakkatorfa. Puffins (Fratercula Arctica) belong to the auk family (Alcidae) and
  • Aldeyjarfoss waterfall in the midnight sun - #Iceland

    Aldeyjarfoss waterfall in the midnight sun - #Iceland

    The Aldeyjarfoss waterfall is situated in the north of Iceland at the northern part of the Sprengisandur Highland Road which means it is to be found within the Highlands of Iceland. One of the most interesting features of the waterfall is the contrast between the black basalt columns and the white waters of the fall. In this, it is similar to the much smaller Icelandic waterfall Svartifoss in Skaftafell. The river Skjálfandafljót drops here from a height of 20 m. The basalt belongs to a lava field called Frambruni or Suðurárhraun, hraun being the Icelandic designation for lava. The land here is part of an apalhraun lava field, which was originally formed by eruptions, some 9500 years ago. The official English terms for basaltic lava flows are taken from Hawaii – apalhraun is a platy lava flow known as ʻaʻā and helluhraun is a ropier kind of lava known as pāhoehoe. Aldeyjarfoss is one of most impressive waterfalls on the Skjálfandafljót River’s route from the Vatnajokull ice cap to Skjálfandi Bay. Others include Ingvararfoss, Hrafnabjargafoss, Barnafoss and the most famous, Goðafoss.
  • The beach and café house at Hellnar village in winter, Snæfell

    The beach and café house at Hellnar village in winter, Snæfell

    For centuries, Hellnar was among the largest fishing villages beneath the Snaefellsjokull ice cap. Although Hellnar village used to be a major port of call for fishing vessels and the largest and busiest centre of fishing and fishing vessels in Snæfellsnes, there were also a few farms in and around Hellnar village along with quite a few semi-permanent and short-stay living quarters for seamen and the migrating workforce. Hellnar village can in all probability trace its function as a major port of call back to the Middle Ages, and the oldest written source of it being describes as a fishing port dates back to 1560. In earlier times, Hellnar would have been in relatively large part fisheries-related farms and buildings, and in the national census of 1703, some 194 individuals were registered as being inhabitants of Hellnar. This same year the buildings and farms of Hellnar are listed as numbering 38 altogether, of which 7 farms are listed as agricultural farms, 11 as having fisheries and fisheries-related functions, and 20 as listed as being semi-permanent or short-stay lodgings for the migrating work force and displaced persons. On the beach some spectacular rock formations are to be seen, one of which is a protruding cliff called Valasnös, which reaches across the ocean front and into the sea. Tunneling into this cliff there is a cave known for colorful changes of lighting and shades that vary in tune with the natural light and the movements of the sea.
  • Gatklettur Lavarock at Djupalonssandur, Snæfellsnes - #Iceland

    Gatklettur Lavarock at Djupalonssandur, Snæfellsnes - #Iceland

    The name Djúpalónssandur is traced back to some of the first settlers in Iceland some twelve hundred years ago. It was the landing place of Bárður Snæfellsás and his family and crew. It is also a place where farmers and people at Snæfellsne Peninsula used as a fishing station for centuries. And last but not least it is a beautiful place with stunning landforms. Djúpalónssandur is a sandy beach and bay on foot of Snæfellsjökull in Iceland. It was once home to sixty fishing boats and one of the most prolific fishing villages on the Snæfellsnes peninsula but today the bay is uninhabited. A short walk down Nautastígur path - the Path of the Bull - will take you through a lava field with huge lava formations. There is a peculiar rock here with a hole in it, called Gatklettur. Through the hole, one can see Snæfellsjökull glacier. The name of the path, the Path of the Bulls, derives from bull being led down this path and watered by the lagoon.. There are two small freshwater lagoons behind Nautastígur, called Djúpulón or the Deep Lagoons, but this beach got its name from these lagoons - Djúpalónssandur or the Deep Lagoon's Sand. The lower lagoon was said to be abysmal as it was so deep. Djúpulón lagoon was measured by the noted Eggert Ólafsson (1726-1768) and turned out not to be abysmal but ca 5 meter's deep. The other lagoon behind Gatklettur rock is called Svörtulón or the Black Lagoon. Only the surface water in these 2 lagoons is freshwater as they rise and fall with the tide. Svörtulón contains better water though as a creek runs into it At the beach you will find 4 differently sized stones. They are well known Aflraunasteinar - Steinatök or lifting-stones. They were used to measure the strength of fishermen in Iceland and you can try your strength on these stones yourself. The biggest stone is called Fullsterkur - Strong and weights 154 kg and only the very strong can lift that one. The second one is called Hálfsterkur - Half-Strong
  • Langárfoss near Borgarnes village in winter- Iceland

    Langárfoss near Borgarnes village in winter- Iceland

    Langárfoss is a small roadside waterfall found just downstream of where Route 54 crosses the Langá just outside the town of Borgarnes. The falls drop about 9 feet where the river makes a sharp Z-shaped bend around and through a protrusion of volcanic rock, splitting into several channels as it does so. On the far side of the falls a fish ladder has been blasted into the bedrock to accommodate fish passage, resulting in a portion of the river always being diverted away from the natural part of the falls.
  • Öræfujökull Volcano and Glacier in the twilight, seen from J

    Öræfujökull Volcano and Glacier in the twilight, seen from J

    Öræfajökull, is an ice-covered volcano in south-east Iceland. it lies within the Vatnajökull National Park and is covered by the glacier. The tallest peak in Öræfajökull is Hvannadalshnjúkur peak, standing at 2,110 m (6,921 ft) above sea-level, Hvannadalshnjúkur is a peak in the NW part of the ridge surrounding the volcano's crater. Note that the volcano and glacier share the same name, Öræfajökull. Öræfajökull has erupted twice in historical times, in 1362 and 1728. 1362 eruption In 1362, the volcano erupted explosively, with huge amounts of tephra being ejected. The district of Litla-Hérað was destroyed by floods and tephra fall. Sailors reported pumice “in such masses that ships could hardly make their way through it”. Thick volcanic deposits obliterated farmland and ash travelled as far as western Europe. More than 40 years passed before people again settled the area, which became known as Öræfi. The name literally means an area without harbour, but it took on a meaning of wasteland in Icelandic. 1728 eruption The eruption in August 1727-28 was smaller than 1362, though floods are known to have caused three fatalities when the meltwater swept their farm away. 2017 activity Increased earthquake activity in the form of small tremors ranging from a depth of 1.5–10 km beneath the summit crater, began in August 2017 according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office. The Aviation Colour Code of the United States was raised to yellow on 17 November 2017, after the appearance of an ice-cauldron inside the main crater and increased geothermal activity under the glacier. 2018 activity Increased earthquake activity in April. Glacial flooding is probably the greatest danger posed now, should Öræfajökull erupt. The ice that covers the caldera is estimated to be about 550 metres thick, and rests hundreds of metres above sea level. Even a small eruption would be likely to provoke massive flooding into the region. Fortunately, not many people live in

BE INSPIRED. GET PROFESSIONAL PHOTOS.

Featured images

Exclusive content