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  • Documenting the former Salt factory at Reykjanes - #Iceland

    Documenting the former Salt factory at Reykjanes - #Iceland

    Fish salt was produced in Reykjanes in the years 1979-88 with breaks on behalf of Sjóefnavinnslan hf. After the end of operations, health salt has been produced at the factory also intermittently and most recently in 2001-2. Due to the high volume of waste water from the current Power Plant owned by HS power, raw material for the production is present and also the necessary energy for the production in the form of steam, geothermal and electricity. The conditions for the production of salt in Reykjanes are therefore much more favorable than they were when Sjóefnavinnslan hf. was an operator but then the company itself was drilling for geothermal seawater and steam. Salt production begun again on the Reykjanes peninsula after some pause since the factory was restructured and rebuilt. The beginning of the salt production there can be traced back to 1976 when the salt factory was established. Following the establishment of a preparation company for a salt factory in Reykjanes. It was later changed to Sjóefnavinnslan hf. in 1981. That production did not work well. The Treasury lost a lot of money on participation in these operations. The company then took over Jarðvarmi until the year 1990 when the Icelandic salt company hf. negotiated with Hitaveita Suðurnesja, owner of Sjóefnavinnslan, for the lease of facilities in Reykjanes. ÍSLENSKA saltfélagið hf. on the Reykjanes plant started the factory again in March 1992. Restructuring and extensive changes were made to the factory 1991 to increase capacity and start production of health salt. The Icelandic Salt Company hf. had the uniqueness of companies in Iceland that it is wholly owned by the Danish company Saga Food Ingredients (SFI), which was established in 1989 but was licensed for the operation by the Ministry of Industry. Later it got bankrupt and the factory was demolished around 2009
  • Landscape from Hrafntinnusker

    Landscape from Hrafntinnusker

    A large obsidian field located in the highlands of Iceland, just east of the infamous Mount Hekla. Hrafntinna is the Icelandic name for obsidian... Obsidian is black and glassy, and forms when rhyolite cools very quickly. The surroundings of this area are not only colourful, but also filled with many hot springs, steam vents, boiling mud pits and ice caves. Despite the hard ice, there is actually geothermal activity happening under the surface so it is not recommended to enter the caves.
  • Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    The old „farmhouse“ at Thingvellir (Þingvallabær) was built in 1929-1930 in accordance with drawings made be the Icelandic architect Guðjón Samúelsson. With his drawings he tried to recreate the atmosphere and the beauty of the old Icelandic turf farmhouses with a new building material concrete. Originally the farmhouse had 3 gables with turf on them. But the roofs turned out to be too steep for the turf to stay put, so they soon changed it and put copper on the roofs. In 1970 it was decided to add two more gables to the farmhouse and that was finished in 1974. Originally the farmhouse was build as a place for the minister of the church at Thingvellir. But since 1974 a summer house for the prime minister and also a place where he can great and entertain guests. In one of the gables there are offices for the Thingvellir Commission, and for the director of the national park and also for the minister of the church. The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944.
  • Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    The old „farmhouse“ at Thingvellir (Þingvallabær) was built in 1929-1930 in accordance with drawings made be the Icelandic architect Guðjón Samúelsson. With his drawings he tried to recreate the atmosphere and the beauty of the old Icelandic turf farmhouses with a new building material concrete. Originally the farmhouse had 3 gables with turf on them. But the roofs turned out to be too steep for the turf to stay put, so they soon changed it and put copper on the roofs. In 1970 it was decided to add two more gables to the farmhouse and that was finished in 1974. Originally the farmhouse was build as a place for the minister of the church at Thingvellir. But since 1974 a summer house for the prime minister and also a place where he can great and entertain guests. In one of the gables there are offices for the Thingvellir Commission, and for the director of the national park and also for the minister of the church. The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944.
  • Þingvellir

    Þingvellir

    The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power.
  • Þingvellir

    Þingvellir

    The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power.
  • Þingvellir

    Þingvellir

    The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power.
  • Þingvellir

    Þingvellir

    The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power.
  • Þingvellir

    Þingvellir

    The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power.
  • Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    Þingvallabær farmhouse and the Church at Þingvellir - #Icelan

    The old „farmhouse“ at Thingvellir (Þingvallabær) was built in 1929-1930 in accordance with drawings made be the Icelandic architect Guðjón Samúelsson. With his drawings he tried to recreate the atmosphere and the beauty of the old Icelandic turf farmhouses with a new building material concrete. Originally the farmhouse had 3 gables with turf on them. But the roofs turned out to be too steep for the turf to stay put, so they soon changed it and put copper on the roofs. In 1970 it was decided to add two more gables to the farmhouse and that was finished in 1974. Originally the farmhouse was build as a place for the minister of the church at Thingvellir. But since 1974 a summer house for the prime minister and also a place where he can great and entertain guests. In one of the gables there are offices for the Thingvellir Commission, and for the director of the national park and also for the minister of the church. The church at Thingvellir was built in 1859 and was inaugurated on Christmas day that year. In 1907 in preparing for the visit of the king of Danmark (who was also the king of Iceland in that time) the tower was changed. In the tower there are three bells, one old one (not known how old it is), one given to the church of Jón Vidalín bishop in 1698 and the third one is the Iceland bell from 1944.

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