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  • Highlands of Veiðivötn in the morning light- #Iceland

    Highlands of Veiðivötn in the morning light- #Iceland

    The beautiful area of Veiðivötn, just northeast of Landmannalaugar, is an entanglement of small desert lakes in a volcanic basin, a continuation of the same fissure that produced Laugahraun in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve. The crater formations here are of a true extraterrestrial character and environment something truly unique. The contrast between black sand and gin clear waters is very unique. This part of the country is among the youngest (1477) and wildest pearls of the central highlands. It comprises about 50 lakes of different sizes, most of which are so-called crater lakes. The area is about 20 km long and 5 km wide and has a southwest - northeast direction. The craters and the lakes lie in two rows. You have to ford the small river between the two Fossvotn lakes to get into the area. Most of the lakes are fed and discharged underground because the lava fields and the scoria are very permeable.
  • Surroundings of Landmannalaugar Highlands from air - Iceland

    Surroundings of Landmannalaugar Highlands from air - Iceland

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • In the Highlands of Landmannalaugar geothermal area- #Iceland

    In the Highlands of Landmannalaugar geothermal area- #Iceland

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • Stóra-Eldborg and Mt. Geitahlíð at Reykjanes - Iceland

    Stóra-Eldborg and Mt. Geitahlíð at Reykjanes - Iceland

    On the southern slopes of Geitahlíð in Krýsuvík is one of the most magnificent volcanic craters in the Reykjanes peninsula. It is called Stora-Eldborg for a distinction from smaller relatives down in the lava fields, Litla - Eldborg. Eldborg is by far the highest of five craters lying along a volcanic fissure in the slopes of Geitafell, Stóra-Eldborg is a very formidable crater about 20 meters deep. It is a short distance from Suðurstrandavegur and therefore it is possible to scoop it up for a look at this beautiful natural construction. It is also interesting to stroll up the pass north of the crater, up the Geitahlíð itself to observe the volcano from above. The lava from Eldborg is around 7000-8000 years old.
  • Hengill central volcano area with bird’s eye in wintertime - I

    Hengill central volcano area with bird’s eye in wintertime - I

    The Hengill central volcano is situated in the southwest of Iceland, to the south of Þingvellir. The volcano covers an area of about 100 km². The volcano is still active, evidenced by the numerous hot springs and fumaroles, but the last eruption occurred approximately 2000 years ago. The volcano is an important source of energy for the south of the country, which is captured at the Nesjavellir power station (near the western shore of the lake Þingvallavatn) and the Hellisheiði power station (approximately 11 km south and west of Nesjavellir). Both stations are operated by Orkuveita Reykjavíkur (Reykjavik Energy). The area with its mountains and hot springs is well suited for hiking and there are a lot of hiking trails. The small town of Hveragerði with its multitude of hot springs is also part of the Hengill area. Some folk tales and sagas are connected to the region. For example, a young farmer is said to have killed the sleeping troll woman Jóra while she lay in wait for innocent wanderers or horsemen on the trail over Dyrafjöll
  • Teigarhorn farm with the Mountain Búlandstindur in the backgrou

    Teigarhorn farm with the Mountain Búlandstindur in the backgrou

    Teigarhorn has great attraction for people with an interest in rocks and minerals, and there are also several historical relics there. The property was a tenant farm. It was considered quite poor land and sugared a great deal from blowing sand in the 19th century. In the year 1869, Niels Weywadt, the manager of the general store in Djúpivogur bought Teirgarhorn and began farming there. In 1880-81, he had a fine house built on the farm, which still stands and is maintained by the National Museum. The ruins of a summer outpost or SEL can be seen in Búlandsdalur. Búlandstindur (1069m) one of the most beautifully shaped mountains in Iceland, towers over the site. The same family has lived in Teigarhorn for an entire century. There has been regular weather observation at the farm Teigarhorn since 1881, and before that in the village of Djúpivogur where it commenced in 1872. The average temperature at Teigarhorn from 1861-1990 was 3.7C, in July being 8.8C and in January 0.3C. Average precipitation during the same period amounted to 1230mm, coming primarily from a south-easterly direction. There is often fog at Teigarhorn, as there is on many of the headlands of East Iceland, where there are about 60 days of fog a year. Teigarhorn holds the high-temperature record for Iceland, with a reading of 30.5C on 22 June 1939.
  • White Tulips - Iceland.

    White Tulips - Iceland.

    Tulip mania (Dutch: tulpenmanie) was a period in the Dutch Golden Age during which contract prices for some bulbs of the recently introduced and fashionable tulip reached extraordinarily high levels and then dramatically collapsed in February 1637. It is generally considered the first recorded speculative bubble; although some researchers have noted that the Kipper und Wipper (literally "Tipper and See-Saw") episode in 1619–1622, a Europe-wide chain of debasement of the metal content of coins to fund warfare, featured mania-like similarities to a bubble. In many ways, the tulip mania was more of a hitherto unknown socio-economic phenomenon than a significant economic crisis. Historically, it had no critical influence on the prosperity of the Dutch Republic, the world's leading economic and financial power in the 17th century. Also, from about 1600 to 1720 the Dutch had the highest per capita income in the world. The term "tulip mania" is now often used metaphorically to refer to any large economic bubble when asset prices deviate from intrinsic values.
  • Grænadyngja Mountain at Reykjanes Peninsula - Iceland

    Grænadyngja Mountain at Reykjanes Peninsula - Iceland

    Grænadyngja (402m) is a steep hyaloclastite mountain. It has the same geological features as Trölladyngja Mountain. It is a geothermal site with volcanic fissures. From the fissures there have been various lava flows towards the west of the peninsula, including Afstapahraun (aa type) close to Reykjanesbraut Mt. Grænadyngja is a geosite in Reykanes Unesco Global Geopark along with Mt. Trölladyngja.
  • The colorful valley in the Highlands of Iceland

    The colorful valley in the Highlands of Iceland

    Sogaselsdalur in the highlands of Iceland is an old almost cooled down geothermal valley where you still can see all the clay on the hill side. It’s not recommended to walk in the valley itself as the clay gets stuck under your sole. This is a beautiful hidden Gem.
  • My personal, natural hot spa in the Highlands of Iceland

    My personal, natural hot spa in the Highlands of Iceland

    When you spend as much time in the highlands of Iceland as I do, taking photos, finding new angles and exploring, you are bound to discover places that few people, even nobody else know about. Some of these places are only few meters away from public footpaths, although hidden so that they are not seen unless you go few meters out from the path. This is one of those places that I discover and I often stop by, when I go to the mountains and lie in the hot water before or after the photographic expedition. This is my private natural spa. The water is crystal clear, with right temperature and I’m alone with myself and the nature. The bird’s fly all around me and some of them stop by to look at this strange phenomenon that lies there with a big smile. No distractions, just myself with the universe. Love it.

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