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  • Herring factory at Djúpavík village - Westfjords, Iceland

    Herring factory at Djúpavík village - Westfjords, Iceland

    "The historical village of Djúpavík dates back to 1917, when a herring factory was established in this small creek by the fjord Reykjarfjörður. The first attempt was short lived but in 1934 a new factory was erected, the largest concrete house in Iceland at the time. The factory operated until 1954, but today it serves as an exhibition building. The houses in Djúpavík are only used as summer dwellings today, except for the hotel, Hótel Djúpavík, which is open all year. Prior to 1917, the area around Djúpavík hosted farmsteads for hundreds of years. Around 1916 only one family lived there. The village of Djúpavík was first settled in 1917 when Elías Stefánsson built a herring salting factory there. Guðjón Jónsson moved to Djúpavík in 1917 with his wife Krístín Guðmundsdóttirthe and three children to serve as the factory's supervisor. They were the village's first residents. That year brought many challenges to the herring industry in Iceland. There were shortages of fuel oil and salt, and the import price of coal and other supplies rose sharply. Both cod and herring catches were small. In the following year, the Armistice of 11 November 1918 led to reduced demand for exports from Iceland. The enterprise went bankrupt in 1919. Although the business was briefly taken over by others, the site was abandoned during the 1920s. Guðjón stayed on at the factory until 1921. 1934 saw the resettlement of Djúpavík with the foundation of Djúpavík Ltd. in September of that year. A new factory was built (at the time of its construction it was the biggest concrete building in Iceland and one of the biggest in Europe) and, despite the harsh conditions, the construction was completed within the span of just one year and the factory was operational by July 1935. Herring catches started to decline after 1944, with a sharp drop in 1948 (when there were almost no catches for two years) and, despite attempts to keep the enterprise running by processing other f
  • The old Djúpavík village.- Westfjords #Iceland

    The old Djúpavík village.- Westfjords #Iceland

    "The historical village of Djúpavík dates back to 1917, when a herring factory was established in this small creek by the fjord Reykjarfjörður. The first attempt was short lived but in 1934 a new factory was erected, the largest concrete house in Iceland at the time. The factory operated until 1954, but today it serves as an exhibition building. The houses in Djúpavík are only used as summer dwellings today, except for the hotel, Hótel Djúpavík, which is open all year. Prior to 1917, the area around Djúpavík hosted farmsteads for hundreds of years. Around 1916 only one family lived there. The village of Djúpavík was first settled in 1917 when Elías Stefánsson built a herring salting factory there. Guðjón Jónsson moved to Djúpavík in 1917 with his wife Krístín Guðmundsdóttirthe and three children to serve as the factory's supervisor. They were the village's first residents. That year brought many challenges to the herring industry in Iceland. There were shortages of fuel oil and salt, and the import price of coal and other supplies rose sharply. Both cod and herring catches were small. In the following year, the Armistice of 11 November 1918 led to reduced demand for exports from Iceland. The enterprise went bankrupt in 1919. Although the business was briefly taken over by others, the site was abandoned during the 1920s. Guðjón stayed on at the factory until 1921. 1934 saw the resettlement of Djúpavík with the foundation of Djúpavík Ltd. in September of that year. A new factory was built (at the time of its construction it was the biggest concrete building in Iceland and one of the biggest in Europe) and, despite the harsh conditions, the construction was completed within the span of just one year and the factory was operational by July 1935. Herring catches started to decline after 1944, with a sharp drop in 1948 (when there were almost no catches for two years) and, despite attempts to keep the enterprise running by processing other f
  • The Sorcerer's Cottage Klúka.- Westfjords #Iceland

    The Sorcerer's Cottage Klúka.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Icelanders lived in turf houses from the settlement of Iceland in ca 874, and the last inhabitants of turf houses here in Iceland moved out in ca 1966. We have only got a few turf houses left in Iceland, mainly the larger turf houses from the 19th century, which were much bigger and bounteous than the turf houses of the commoners. In the remote Strandir area in the Westfjords of Iceland, the mystical Kotbýli kuklarans - the Sorcerer's Cottage Klúka awaits you. It represents both the habitation and living conditions of a sorcerer, but also the normal living conditions of tenant farmers in the 17th century. The Sorcerer's Cottage consists of 3 connected turf houses made of turf (sod), rocks and driftwood according to age-old methods. Driftwood is one of the main resources in this remote area of the Westfjords and was used here as a building material for the turf houses to a much greater extent than in other parts of Iceland. A plea was made to Icelanders for things to use in the Sorcerer's Cottage, f.ex. hides, lambskin, scythe-handle, rakes and all kinds of tools used in the turf houses in the olden times. The kind of magic they used was harmless and could have been something like using simple magic for making your cow milk better or your grass grow better, or your tools more efficient - something to make your daily life easier on this harsh island
  • Inside Icelandic turf hous.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Inside Icelandic turf hous.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Icelandic turf houses (Icelandic: torfbæir) were the product of a difficult climate, offering superior insulation compared to buildings solely made of wood or stone, and the relative difficulty in obtaining other construction materials in sufficient quantities. 30% of Iceland was forested when it was settled, mostly with birch. Oak was the preferred timber for building Norse halls in Scandinavia, but native birch had to serve as the primary framing material on the remote island. However, Iceland did have a large amount of turf that was suitable for construction. Some structures in Norway had turf roofs, so the notion of using this as a building material was not alien to many settlers. The common Icelandic turf house would have a large foundation made of flat stones; upon this was built a wooden frame which would hold the load of the turf. The turf would then be fitted around the frame in blocks often with a second layer, or in the more fashionable herringbone style. The only external wood would be the doorway which would often be decorative; the doorway would lead into the hall which would commonly have a great fire. The floor of a turf house could be covered with wood, stone or earth depending on the purpose of the building. They also contain grass on their roofs.
  • Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri is the largest settlement in the 2km deep fjord, Önundarfjörður, in the Westfjords, Iceland. It's populations is still just under 200 people. Even by the Westfjords’ high standards, Önundarfjörður is known the island over for its sublime beauty, tabletop mountains, and eccentric museums. Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. In October 1995 an avalanche hit the village, destroying 29 homes and killing 20 people. Since then a deflecting dam has been built to protect the village from any further avalanches. In the 1990s, Flateyri prospered as a fishing village and, but after the 2008–11 financial crisis hit its main fishing companies shut down and many people left. A German fishing company has set up base in Flateyri and is currently fishing in and just out of Önundarfjörður.
  • Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri is the largest settlement in the 2km deep fjord, Önundarfjörður, in the Westfjords, Iceland. It's populations is still just under 200 people. Even by the Westfjords’ high standards, Önundarfjörður is known the island over for its sublime beauty, tabletop mountains, and eccentric museums. Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. In October 1995 an avalanche hit the village, destroying 29 homes and killing 20 people. Since then a deflecting dam has been built to protect the village from any further avalanches. In the 1990s, Flateyri prospered as a fishing village and, but after the 2008–11 financial crisis hit its main fishing companies shut down and many people left. A German fishing company has set up base in Flateyri and is currently fishing in and just out of Önundarfjörður.
  • Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri is the largest settlement in the 2km deep fjord, Önundarfjörður, in the Westfjords, Iceland. It's populations is still just under 200 people. Even by the Westfjords’ high standards, Önundarfjörður is known the island over for its sublime beauty, tabletop mountains, and eccentric museums. Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. In October 1995 an avalanche hit the village, destroying 29 homes and killing 20 people. Since then a deflecting dam has been built to protect the village from any further avalanches. In the 1990s, Flateyri prospered as a fishing village and, but after the 2008–11 financial crisis hit its main fishing companies shut down and many people left. A German fishing company has set up base in Flateyri and is currently fishing in and just out of Önundarfjörður.
  • Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri is the largest settlement in the 2km deep fjord, Önundarfjörður, in the Westfjords, Iceland. It's populations is still just under 200 people. Even by the Westfjords’ high standards, Önundarfjörður is known the island over for its sublime beauty, tabletop mountains, and eccentric museums. Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. In October 1995 an avalanche hit the village, destroying 29 homes and killing 20 people. Since then a deflecting dam has been built to protect the village from any further avalanches. In the 1990s, Flateyri prospered as a fishing village and, but after the 2008–11 financial crisis hit its main fishing companies shut down and many people left. A German fishing company has set up base in Flateyri and is currently fishing in and just out of Önundarfjörður.
  • At the harbor of Flateyri village.- Westfjords #Iceland

    At the harbor of Flateyri village.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. The fjord also offers great opportunities for kayaking.
  • Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri village in Önundarfjörður.- Westfjords #Iceland

    Flateyri is the largest settlement in the 2km deep fjord, Önundarfjörður, in the Westfjords, Iceland. It's populations is still just under 200 people. Even by the Westfjords’ high standards, Önundarfjörður is known the island over for its sublime beauty, tabletop mountains, and eccentric museums. Flateyri has been a trading post since 1792 and saw its heyday in the 19th century when it was home to a fleet of decked vessels and the base for shark-hunting and whaling operations. The fishing industry has always been vital for the villages in the Westfjords, and in Flateyri the tradition of fishing has successfully been linked to tourism as the village has become a very popular destination for foreign sea anglers. In October 1995 an avalanche hit the village, destroying 29 homes and killing 20 people. Since then a deflecting dam has been built to protect the village from any further avalanches. In the 1990s, Flateyri prospered as a fishing village and, but after the 2008–11 financial crisis hit its main fishing companies shut down and many people left. A German fishing company has set up base in Flateyri and is currently fishing in and just out of Önundarfjörður.

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