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  • Gatastakkur - Beautiful sea arch at Raudanes peninsula in Northe

    Gatastakkur - Beautiful sea arch at Raudanes peninsula in Northe

    Gatastakkur is a strangely formed, basaltic dyke eroded by the breakers. Centuries ago, volcanic eruption pressed a small flow of lava into a crack in the existing soil. With time, the forces of nature have eroded the surrounding soil, leaving only the lava sculpture behind.
  • Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon

    Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon

    Jökulsárlón literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries.The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
  • The glacier tongue of Skaftafellsjökull. – Documenting #Icela

    The glacier tongue of Skaftafellsjökull. – Documenting #Icela

    The glacier tongue of Skaftafellsjökull sits in Skaftafell, a nature reserve in Öræfi, Vatnajökull National Park.It’s an outlet of Vatnajökull, which is the largest continental glacier in Europe. It is one of many tongues stretching from the largest glacier in Europe, Vatnajökull itself. This ice cap covered eleven percent of the surface area of Iceland. Skaftafellsjökull is an excellent but concerning example of how climate change is steadily affecting the glaciers in Iceland. Over the last decade, Skaftafellsjökull has been receding dramatically, only strengthening the argument that environmental policies must look to preserve Iceland's unique, important and beautiful natural features. Many trees have been planted in the area to help absorb carbon dioxide around the glaciers, but tragically, many scientists believe that this is too little, too late.
  • Lakagígar Craters from air

    Lakagígar Craters from air

    Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Þórðarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction
  • The small house on the cliff at Arnarstapi – Documenting #Icel

    The small house on the cliff at Arnarstapi – Documenting #Icel

    Arnarstapi or Stapi is a small fishing village at the foot of Mt. Stapafell between Hellnar village and Breiðavík farms on the southern side of Snæfellsnes, Iceland. Placenames in the vicinity of Arnarstapi and nearby Hellnar village are inspired by Bárðar saga Snæfellsáss, an Icelandic saga relating the story of Bárður, a half human and half ogre. Arnarstapi was a natural site for landings and harbor for small vessels, and therefore ideal for a shipping port. In the olden days, Arnarstapi was thus from very early on, a busy fishing port and commercial centre servicing the West coast area under the Danish crown and a merchant monopoly of Denmark was in effect from 1565. From then on and through the 17th and 18th century, agents of the Danish crown had custodial power over Arnarstapi and commercial rights by royal appointment over nearby lands, formerly owned by Helgafell monastery and monopoly of all trade in the area. Several old houses from that time, each with its own unique history, can be seen at Arnarstapi, the old Amtmannshús (The Danish Prefect's Residence (1774–1787) having a history of its own, it having been moved in 1849 to nearby Vogur á Mýrum, where it stayed until 1983, when it was moved back again to Arnarstapi in 1985 and declared a historical site in 1990. There resided amongst other notables, Danish Prefect Bjarni Thorsteinsson (1821–1849), whose son was renowned poet and writer Steingrímur Thorsteinsson. Today Arnarstapi is still a somewhat busy harbor during the summer months serving private fishing and recreational vessels as well with its maintained docks that were renewed in 2002. Being a popular destination of tourists in summer, Arnarstapi is today a thriving centre for local tourism activities where there is a variety of natural and culinary attractions as well and a cluster of second homes are located in and around the village. There is much beauty to be found in nearby attractions, and an old horse trail past Neðstava
  • Highlands of Landmannalaugar from air

    Highlands of Landmannalaugar from air

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • The Vik church (Víkurkirkja) on the hill at Vík village in the

    The Vik church (Víkurkirkja) on the hill at Vík village in the

    The Vik church (Víkurkirkja) was built between the years of 1932 and 1934 and it is made of concrete. The church can seat roughly 200 church-goers. The most significant relic the church holds is an altar containing paintings by a famous Icelandic painter Brynjólfur Þórðarson. The church is situated above the village of Vik and it offers some very nice views of Vik together with its most interesting sights, the ocean and the mountains all around. Further details from Wikipedia: Vík lies directly south of the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, which itself is on top of the Katla volcano. Katla has not erupted since 1918, and this longer than typical dormant period has led to speculation that an eruption may occur soon. An eruption of Katla could melt enough ice to trigger an enormous flash flood, potentially large enough to obliterate the entire town. The town's church, located high on a hill, is believed to be the only building that would survive such a flood. Thus, the people of Vík practice periodic drills and are trained to rush to the church at the first sign of an eruption.
  • Landmannalaugar Highlands from air

    Landmannalaugar Highlands from air

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • Near Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Steaming hot river

    Near Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Steaming hot river

    The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissurezone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland Krýsuvík consists of several geothermal fields, such as Seltún. Here solfataras, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs have formed, the soil is coloured. Sulphuric water and gases have created colorful deposits, the soil is colored in green, yellow and red colors. Visitors can wonder at hissing solfataras, fumaroles and boiling mud pots, where the soil is mixed with acid. . Sulphur deposits were mined in 1722 – 1728 and in the 19th century.
  • Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Beautiful, Steamy Smell

    Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Beautiful, Steamy Smell

    The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissurezone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland Krýsuvík consists of several geothermal fields, such as Seltún. Here solfataras, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs have formed, the soil is coloured. Sulphuric water and gases have created colorful deposits, the soil is colored in green, yellow and red colors. Visitors can wonder at hissing solfataras, fumaroles and boiling mud pots, where the soil is mixed with acid. . Sulphur deposits were mined in 1722 – 1728 and in the 19th century.

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